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sandy, t the disappearing ice slights at the north pole becoming ever harder to ignore but science and facts continue to demonstrate that yes climate change is real. so no one should really be surprised the last year was the hottest on record for north america, shattering the old record by one entire degree. that may not sound like a lot but keep in mind, if the world's average temperature increases by 5 degrees scientists think sea levels could climb as much as 20 feet causing cities like miami new orleans, to go the route of atlantis. skeptics keep on being skeptics. you are right. climate change science is a sinister conspiracy by the entire world scientific community to slightly reduce corporate profit by convincing people that air pollution is bad. that makes a lot more sense. joining us now via skype is heroic environmentalist and founder of the man who's become the leading face in the movement to raise awareness about climate change, bill mckickin'. it is an honor to have you here on the program. >> very good to be with you. >> john: is it worst that we broke the rec
. and those of you who study the science understand what i'm talking about. you need proper brain chemistry to, through these very important glands, hypothalamus and pituitary, to communicate with the gonads >>yeah. in doing the research for the show john, and i was reading about, testosterone levels in men usually peak around dawn, like four, five o'clock in the morning now. in ancient times it's because we were going out hunting and gathering in doubt killing things to bring back for food. >>>dinosaurs >> talks to the issue of morning erections >>>um hum >>and as men lose this, that doesn't happen for them anymore, right? >>>well, first off, i'm here for moral, ethical, consensual sexual reasons. we are procreative creatures. it's in our genetic code whether we are consciously aware of it or not. >> creatures. man is been pretty good at it. because i remember reading that we only started out with two people, and now were about 7 billion. so we're really good at procreating. the sexual responses given to us by the universe or mother nature. we are tested to see if we are capable of inseminati
testicular axis. and those of you who study the science understand what i'm talking about. you need proper brain chemistry to, through these very important glands, hypothalamus and pituitary, to communicate with the gonads >>yeah. in doing the research for the show john, and i was reading about, testosterone levels in men usually peak around dawn, like four, five o'clock in the morning now. in ancient times it's because we were going out hunting and gathering in doubt killing things to bring back for food. >>>dinosaurs >>ut it also talks to the issue of morning erections >>>um hum >>and as men lose this, that doesn't happen for them anymore, right? >>>well, first off, i'm here for moral, ethical, consensual sexual reasons. we are procreative creatures. it's in our genetic code whether we are consciously aware of it or not. >>m hum >>>we are procreative creatures. man is been pretty good at it. because i remember reading that we only started out with two people, and now were about 7 billion. so we're really good at procreating. the sexual responses given to us by the universe or mother natu
. bjorn lomborg worries about air pollution and global warming but says the coverage is junk science? >> it is and very harmful. it tells us 5 million people will die every year because of global warming. they fail to say it has nothing to do with global warming. just the 3 million people was from indoor air pollution. if anything it is the opposite. lots of poor people in the third world burn cardboard or dong and they die from burning fat inside their houses. maybe give them cleaner fuels our fossil fuels there will be better. they tell us the wrong story and the wrong solution. john: the particulates kill people. global warming is theoretical. >> they say cut carbon emissions to help people dying from air pollution. no. don't burn down inside your house. we dot think of it because it was 100 years ago we had dirty fuels. john: in the west. but they pander to talk about the big storms caused by global warming. here is out for. >> this storm was related to global warming. the second ones in 100 years storm within 14 months. john: 2012 was below average the hurricanes go up and down.
rounds and then walked into the science building midway through first period. >> we have video of him entering the school, trying conceal the shot gun. we have the video showing that he is nervous. >> officers say the boy walked to the front of the classroom and opened fire, striking a jean-year-old classmate at near point blank range. the students began to flee. trying to hide in closets and run out of the room, another shot, this one missed a target, another 16-year-old boy. morgan was in the classroom and said that the gunman began calling out a name. after he asked for a student three times. the student popped his head up from behind where he was hiding and apologized. >> for what? >> for bullying him, freshman year. >> then the classroom's teacher stepped in between the 12 gauge shot gun and the fleeing students. the well liked teacher spoke to the boy like his friend and investigators say the boy told him, i don't want to shoot you. meanwhile the school's counselor helped to distract the gunman while the rest of the 28 students escaped. >> this teacher and this counselor stood t
. [applause] >> thank you very much, everyone, for coming. thank you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm
the nra was able to whip up their members in a frenzy. this is a classic political science case study of an interest group that is very intense and cares almost about this thing alone. on the top list of concerns, guns are one through ten, against a public that cares about this and a lot of other things and whose attention may wax and wane depending what else is going on in their lives. they are very intense, they have a lot of money, and it's a good sign that liberal groups and groups like the mayors that bloomberg is supporting -- >> mayors against guns. >> are getting out there and trying to get their foot into the debate politically with donations but also this changing the dynamics because this can't go forward and succeed unless there's a strong coalition including police and citizens and public health advocates fighting as hard as the nra fights. >> eric holder, the attorney general, met with retailers including the nation's largest seller of firearms, walmart, and some 250,000 survivors of gun violence have sent a letter with protests planned on tuesday to move them to stop se
has been to china many times knows his markets and political science has told us china was way too restrictive in the monetary policy, that somehow the communist party got caught up on worrying about inflation, not worrying about growth. come on, malice, be like mal for heaven sake. i think they're still going with the techs, though. that's over. klaus is confident that when the dpovt unveils the plan for growth in february, they're going to dazzle, from a disappointing 8% to a stunning 11%. there's plenty to like if china gets ho the t in here and takin all its clothes, that's ray lewis. the chinese are addicted to coal. and we know electric uses have gotten stronger and stronger as the year's gone on. got that data. although joy's up about 10% in two weeks. you can look at truck manufacturers as the chinese are back with a vengeance. but i don't know, i don't want to outthink this. the best way to play china is china, specifically the etf for the biggest chinese stocks i've steered you away from owning individual stocks except for brief flirtation with baydu. nevertheless, call m
to go to that is on the far side of the moon that can be the robotic science can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen which is fuel the conference recently as following a workshop that has been sent out in the international learning basis by practicing on the island of hawaii to assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down and where are they expected? another one down at some distance away how do you put them together? if it's on hawaii, you do that through a satellite back to the mission control. so you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why am i so enthusiastic about that? because that's exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the moon of mars who can then assemble the base we will then send people and we should assure ourselves we should protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere and that's the moon, too. >> kevin has a two-part question and i should ask the second part first. do you belie
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. ♪ oh monday morning ♪ you gave me no warning >>> quite frankly, chuck hagel is out of the mainstream of thinking, i believe, on most issues regarding foreign policy. i expect the president to nominate people different than i would think. i'm going to vote for senator kerry. i don't agree with him a lot, but i think he's very much in the mainstream of thought. chuck hagel, if confirmed to be secretary of defense, would be the most antagonistic secretary of defense toward the nation of israel in our nation's history. he has long severed his ties with the republican party. this is an in-your-face nomination by the president to all of us who are supportive of israel. >> chuck hagel was a republican senator from nebraska, a decorated veteran of the vietnam war, a person who has a resume that include
. but the key thing is he says science and technology could be a way to improve the economy. from what we've seen on our visits though,, both he and perhaps google's schmidt might have their work cut out for them. one of our earlier visits we were shown what appeared to be an internet center at a library. in fact it was a intranet center. the folks in north korea have almost no access to the real worldwide web and in our last visit, jon, we saw more mobile phones out in the streets but there is a hitch there too. these mobile phones can not connect outside of north korea. in fact they're more dumb than smartphones. however who knows. schmidt might have the idea to get a few more phones, google phones, google tablets google searches in north korea. jon: information wants to be free. greg palkot in london. thank you. jenna: it is a known fact that obesity is not good for your health but seems some risks get more attention than others. a new survey finding while most americans realize carrying too much pounds can contribute to heart disease and diabetes there are other series -- serious cons
to make sure that anybody that read it could understand it. and like i said before, it's not a science. it's you follow step one, step two, step three, there's pictures, there's graphs, it shows you exactly where to click and what to do. >>> so you're using this for your personal income? if you're giving us your software that you're using, aren't you generating competition? >oh that's a good question. why would you share this with all of us? we're going to be your competition now aren't we? >>everybody asks me that. here's the thing, there are over 850,000,000 people just on facebook. i can't have all of them. and one thing that- one thing that my dad taught me when i was growing up is, you know, greed gets you nowhere. it doesn't get you anywhere. i know i can't have them so why not share it and help everybody else out. there's always going to be somebody else there. >>> thanks for sharing. right now. you need to pick up your phone and you need to dial the number that you see on your screen right now. you're going to get adrian's book. it's called social media profits from your home. you
he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ound shipping at fedex office. >> good morning, "varney & company" viewers, today is thursday, january the 10th. the big story of the day is guns, and just how the president will deal with the very strong calls for action. the public wants something done. how will the president get it done? joe biden brings in the n.r.a., hollywood and wal-mart and many others with a stake in the gun debate. the headline out of these talks so far, president obama may take executive action, and step around congress and avoid the legislative process. but the the action isn't all just in d.c. the gun control debate is a national issue. just last night new york's governor cuomo call
is a bright, articulate guy who believes in science. he's wacky for that. i disagree with him on most issues but we need someone--with christie he does show flexibility like in new jersey he said after sandy we're going to have to raise taxes. that points to the other republicans who were so--they don't live in reality. chris christie lives in the real world. >> christie has done a great effort to reach out to minorities who are demonized by other republicans. a muslim-american who was demonized, and christie said enough of this crazy. >> he called out the shariya law they were scamming. >> he nominateed them and they were rejected by the senate. >> you support muslim support gays mr. christie meet the tea party. >> because he's moderate on abortion. he's with the exception of rape and incest, which is now--it used to be that was a conservative position. now it's a moderate position. >> and the etch-a-sketch. >> john: that's right. for chris christie, for all the things people like about him he still believes women who terminate pregnancyies serve to be in jail. we have more to talk about ri
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >>> take a look at shares of boeing. they are up by about 3% move. moving up after selling off monday and tuesday. coming after several problems with the company's dream liner aircraft. but boeing doing a little bit of push back today aep phil has the story. hi, phil. >> hi, tyler. boeing just wrapped up a conference call with reporters updating where they believe the 787 is in terms of reliability. two pieces of news. the first one being that in terms of reliability after 15 airplanes in service, the dream plane is where the 787 was. rebuilt of taking off and landing on time. other piece of news has to do the lithium ion batteries on board. here is what the chief of safety has it say about use of these batteries. >> we have over a million hours of safe operation of these battery cell in flight. so i continue to be very confident in the battery technology and
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. (blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. >>> welcome back to "power lunch." here we have backed off rath
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ashley: alcoa reporting corporate earnings earlier this hour. on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole: first we're going to show you where alcoa clothes on the floor of the new york stock exchange. now coming out with earnings per share right in line and revenue that beat the street, $0.06 matching analyst estimate also revenue came at $5.9 billion exceeding the
to the customer through actuarial science and through claims management. our new role is to create an integrated delivery model driven by primary care providers that uses shared data at the point of care to improve outcomes, lower costs and create a better health care experience. at humana, our model integrates our delivery, data support for clip in additions -- clinicians and wellness and productivity platforms. and in many ways our motto is an evolution with its roots prevalent 20 or 30 years ago. but today simplicity is the key. we believe in integrated delivery model that emphasizes primary care can provide outcomes, lower the cost of care -- especially to patients with critical or complex medical needs, including patients in the medicare and medicaid program. the concept relies on primary care physicians to coordinate care for patients, helping them navigate the health care system so they can receive the right care at the right place at the right time. like many organizations and industries, technology plays such an important role in enabling this to happen. we are investing in today in dat
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. melissa: here is your fox business brief. the united nations is downplaying fears of a global food crisis as drops drop for a third straight month in december. according to the food and agriculture organization food prices were down 7% last year from the year before. the agency also warning bad weather could spark a repeat of the rioting and unrest that hit parts developing world in 2007 and 2008. >>> shares of supervalu are soaring after striking a deal to sell five grocery store chains to a consortium of investors led by cerberus capital management. the deal is worth $3.3 billion. >>> amazon looking to take a bite out of amazon's itunes. they are launching auto rip, a service that gives customers free mp3s of the cds they purchased through their cloud player library. very cool. that's latest from the fox business network, giving you the power to prosper. lori: and the cabinet turnover continues. we're awaiting the president. you're looking li
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ voice of dennis ] driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? from silver screens... to flat screens... twizzlerize your entertainment everyday with twizzlers the twist you can't resist. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. because enbrel, etanercept suppresses your immune system, it may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections tuberculosis lymphoma, other cancers, and nervous system and blood disorders have occurred. before starting enbrel your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. don't start enbrel if
judges, i think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. [laughter] i have not seen a program with that bill 10. t in.ild people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rathe
, played pro football for 20 years before his suicide. his family donated his brain to science. hopefully, we'll learn more about this disease and how it relates to blows to the head. >> yeah. and he's not the only one. >> yeah. >> there's a lawsuit against the nfl brought by other players because of this very thing. >>> let's go to baseball and drug testing. players have now agreed to in-season random testing for hgh. i mean, first -- this is the first american pro u.s. league to test for human fwroeth hormone. for years season after season the players said no. but now they've given in. >> they were doing it during the off season? >> yes. >> it's a blood test that will take place before the games and see what's in their system. >> we know that the announcement of the hall of famers, not having roger clemens, barry bonds or sammy sosa, because of the doping, has really put a black eye on that sport. and hopefully, this will clear up something. >> we'll see. and tiger woods, boy oh, boy, making headlines again. he won't be playing in a golf tournament, by the way, in qatar. apparently he w
right now. >> it's driven by twofold. a stronger strain and earlier start to the sciences than most years. cdc officially labeling the outbreak an epidemic. normal occurrence in the wintertime and very young and very old and underlying diseases should get the vaccine immediately. typically the flu season is about 12 weeks long. we're only about four or five weeks into this year's season. we could have several more weeks to deal with before we're in the clear on this one. >> jamie: that is concern. thank you so much. as she mentioned, the new york governor has declared a statewide emergency becoming the first state to declare because of the severe flu outbreak. executive order suspends a state law to let authorities to administer medications that are only 18 years old. this will last now for the next month. good news. that order comes as nearly 20,000 flu cases have been reported in new york state alone. that is more than four times the positive laboratory results that are normally reported all season. >> gregg: the cost of the flu is shocking. in united states alone the annual direc
at harvard wrote a piece, an op-ed in "christian science monitor" in december of 2008 or so. ncrc proposed doing this with federal fund through a federal agency. and i wrote an article in "the new republic" in lar of 2010 suggesting treasury could use tarp fund and act exactly as the homeowners loan corporation had done, do this not for a profit but specifically to help homeowners. american securitization forum wasn't for that either. >> i just, real quick point on just clarify my position. i'm not opposed to the in concept the use of eminent domain for borrowers who are upside-down, who are current. i'm simply saying that the priority would be in my view for those who are already experiencing financial distress. when you get to the point of they're current, i think other tests could be put in place. that's why i think there needs to be a lot more detail on the table before there's a vote of yes or no. for example, if you're paying 70% of the your income to keep that mortgage current, do you want to force that homeowner to actually go into default before they actually get help and wreck th
was a doctoral candidate in neural science. his attorneys say he was hospitalized in november after repeatedly banging his head into a jail wall. now up until now the judge has had a sweeping gag order in place so as you mentioned earlier, john, this is going to be the first time the public is going to be able to hear a lot of evidence the prosecution has against james holmes, john. >> casey, i have to say it was chilling to hear all that sound from that morning that night especially in light of what the country just went through in newtown. it's amazing to hear that. this hearing will not be quick, am i right? there's a mountain of evidence. we're expecting to hear from a lot of people. >> yeah, there could be as many as 70 witnesses. we're expecting this could last as long as a week. we don't know how much the defense is going to put on, but it's expected they'll begin to lay the groundwork for what's expected to be a diminished mental capacity defense. we know that because of some of the court filings that happened. >> what about a plea from holmes, did we hear anything about that yet? >> n
association of colleges. brand new numbers on the range of salaries, for humanities and social sciences jobs, starting stallry, $37,000. john is laughing and giggling. $62,000 for engineers. choose your major wisely. but the good news here is that graduate salaries are rising and a little easier to get a job this year than last year. >> you need to do a story on that choose your major wisely. >> so hard when are you 18 to choose your major wisely. you're 18. >> you can give parameters and good advice, christine. i'll hold you to that. >>> coming up, look at this. the gun stunt that caused a police lockdown in the northwest. >>> nine years old and an oscar nominee. you will hear from her on what that's like. coming up. ♪ why not make lunch more than just lunch? with two times the points on dining in restaurants, you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. spending the day with my niece. i don't use super poligrip for hold because my dentures fit well. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was uncomfort
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ ashley: fox business break, markets continuing the downward trend ahead of the start of the earning season kicking off tomorrow with aluminum giant due out after the closing bell. right now, a lot of red arrows on the screen. dow off by 55 or 56 points. businesses, meantime, feeling jolly over the holidays, and challenging a gray christmas saying hiring hit a six year high despite uncertainty regarding taxes and spending. the out placement firm says retailers boosted papers more than 10% from 2011. according to the consumer electronics association, global spending on electronics rise 4% this year to $1.1 trillion. the forecast in tablets and smart phone account for 40% of all global spending on glajs. that is the latest from the fox business network giving you the power to prosper. ♪ lori: oil trading tight range today, but how pretty close to the $93 barrel mark, fox business contributor, phil flip in the pits of the cme to update us on what's moving oil tread and what to expect for the week. phil? >> a nice pop here today, a w
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> up next, governor chris christie joins the table. and now i know why -- hi, chris -- now i know why i'm always cold in the studio. it is so great to see you. have a seat. welcome. you wear long johns. you're wearing them right now, meacham is wearing long johns. >> don't make that up. >> yeah. >> outrageous. >> it was quite a sight. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? maybe you want to incorporate a business. or protect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan attorney is available in most states with every personalized document to answer questions. get started at today. and now you're protected. we don't argue much. we really don't. meg usually just gets her way, and i go along with it. i think it worked for matt because i did it for him. when i'm the one cooking, i'm the one calculating the points. i can microwave things. you get to eat real food.
tremendous science-based products that are very high in health and safety and efficacy and we've got a tremendous business opportunity and we're proud of where we are today and confident about our future. >> okay, des, let's talk about the pyramid scheme thesis for a second. first, of your distributors, every year, new distributors join the forces of herbalife, and invariably the argument is made that a large majority of those distributors at the end of year one don't become the millionaires or even making $100,000 or $50,000 or $10,000 that they see in the ads but ultimately that they lose money. pis that true? >> absolutely not. here's one of the fallacies we're hearing from pershing square. what the research shows is the majority of our distributors become distributors because of their affinity with the product and they want to receive a discount. so essentially they're almost like members, club members just like in costco. that's the reality. most of the distributors come for that product discount. of those distributors who come for business opportunity, absolutely they make mone
in university. his numerous books have garnered critical success from the american political science association for the best book in political science. he is also a key facilitator of a facility studies workshop. he has a great deal of experience in the policy field. the senior fellow, he is a former staff member a mark on the national security council and served six years on the national security advisory panel. most recently, he was part of a task force of experts about a new defense strategy for a new era. and a scholar at the american enterprise institute. he has more than three decades of public service and higher education. he was president of the world bank, dean of the johns hopkins school of international studies and assistant secretary of state for east asia. and long served at the pentagon. the great panel to be joined with. i will pose a question to each one of them to kick off the conversation then turn it over to all of you. the first question i want to pose to mike -- what the heck happened on new year's day and even what does it mean for defense? what do you see playing out in t
? >> well no, for me it was really about the science. we're learning so much about the brain that we understand this is a brain illness, the american society of addiction medicines says that this is, there's no difference between the way a process addiction occurs like gambling or the way substance addiction comes. we're understanding these illnesses are in the brain. people need to know that. i'm about reducing stigma and shame and giving people the opportunity and the empowerment to do something about this illness if they want to. >> is it genetics? are certain people pre-disposed to being an addict. >> just like being pre-disposed to cancer or diabetes you also are for depression, anxiety and addiction and many of the genetics overlap so you might have a higher propensity for addiction but also anxiety, depression. they're common mechanisms in the brain. what i love about what chris did, he brought all of at dictions together. it's not just addiction to alcohol over here. if you're addicted to alcohol, better off than not you'll have problems in other areas of your life. so i thin
pain and feel better. all right. let's talk a little bit about the science of why it actually works. can you help me with that? absolutely. here we are. ok. all right folks. now. let me get over here. so what does compression do? let's take a look. it forces pressure up against that leg and it does several things. it actually increases blood flow in the arteries, allowing blood to get further up quicker back into the heart. and that's the beauty of this modality of treatment called compression. now that's the explanation of how compression works from a medical doctor. now let's hear from a doctor who actually uses tommie copper for himself. he's a 72 year old neurosurgeon, who just happens to be, you ready for this? an iron man athlete. take a look at this. hi, i'm joe maroon. i'm a neurosurgeon and i just finished the half iron man triathlon race in muncie indiana. for the first time, i wore the compression on my knee and the undergarments, and i have to say, i finished my best race ever at age 72. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome iron man triathlete, dr. joseph maroon. welcome
. host: should they be highly educated/ should they be skilled in science and math technology? guest: there are conversations about establishing a commission that would have the interest of workers in mind to look at where the economy is requiring workers. the economy doesn't just need engineers. we need to invest in our young people. we need people in the service industry and in other areas. it should complement american workers. they want something that works. let's come up with something that will get the bad employers. host: this is from twitter from jeff. should there be priorities for emigration? guest: does the executive branch have the capacity to regulate immigration? in our view the answer is no. fraud is rampant. it is all political. this has degenerated into a political debate. host: what about the plan about qualified foreign workers? guest: there are millions of americans that need work. temporary or not immigrant visas that are supposed to be for highly skilled workers. employers are reliant on foreign workers for various new applications in growth industries. the long
, it is an enormous break through for science and mythology. a long time, people didn't think they existed. >> talk about the importance of that. this is legends and myths is what we equate to giant squid. >> people thought there was something called a cracken, a giant octopus like creature that eight ships and grabbed people and did horrible things. until we see one alive, we're not sure what they can do. now we know what this actual animal can do. we've seen it at work, we've seen it attacking something. it changes everything. about deep sea biology and about these large cephalopods. >> we have seen sketches from these large squids attacking ocean-going vessels. this is missing two of its arms or tentacles. >> it has eight arms and two very long tentacles. it uses it to grasp prey, the tentacles, and it uses its arms to bring it back to its mouth. it has a beak like parrots. until we saw it ali, we didn't know how this operation worked. we knew what it looked like it was dead. a big blob with long arms that lived somewhere in the ocean and wash as shor washes ashore. i wrote a whole book in "the
of anecdotal claims in lawsuits that aren't true when science is in. the people in pennsylvania brought in the epa and insists -- they said the water was safe. they were angry because that was the end of the lawsuit. every time there's an antidote and analysis, it shows that fracking doesn't pollute the water. >> we have a quote from the department of environmental conservation that finds fault with the new report saying the document is nearly a year old, does not reflect final policy and no conclusions should be drawn from this partial, outdated study. would it help to have a new study done? >> if you like throwing good money after bad. as you say, it's a rehash of hold studies. the first well in america was fracked in 1987. we've report after report and it's time to stop reporting and start doing. people need to take a decision on this. every time it comes to a new state or new country like my country, ireland, the analysis is done. >> one of the serious images was the fact people in fracking areas could light their tap water on fire. that was debunkedded because you proved it has bee
of everything, medicine, technology, science of every kind. no world war iii. something worked pretty well. they did something else that was particularly important. they built coalitions of common interest. i will come back to that. what they recognize, if we were to avert another 50 years like the world had been through the first of jeers and we were going to have to define relationships not by our differences but by our common interests. only then could we build foundations and mutual trust our mutual common interest in order to deal with the differences. you cannot start with the differences. it is a long time to figure that out. they did have it figured out. i will come back to that. i think it is particularly relevant today. what he said about civilizations was very instructive. he said civilizations' are movements. they're not conditions. they are journeys, and not harbors. he said the civilizations died. he chronicles 24 civilizations that have died. civilizations die from suicide, not for murder. when we think of the world today in the threat to mankind today, we're certainly capab
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